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James Stefanchin

James E. Stefanchin

The George Washington University's School of Medicine and Health Sciences

James E. Stefanchin in an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Clinical Research and Leadership at The George Washington University's School of Medicine and Health Sciences. His teaching experience includes courses in in change management, strategic management, knowledge management, research methods, organizational behavior, and leadership at GWU, Western Michigan University, Northeastern University, Embry- Riddle Aeronautical University, and within the University of Maryland system. Jim is a frequent speaker and presenter at HR conferences across North America. He's on the editorial board of Advances in Developing Human Resources. Jim is currently the director, talent, learning, and organization development at Panasonic Corporation of North America. There, he partners with business and functional leaders to ensure strategies and tactics are in place to enable continual growth and evolution across Panasonic's many businesses. He works in Newark, NJ but resides outside of Detroit, MI with his wife, two dogs, and tiny cat. When he's not teaching, researching, or driving practice, Jim can usually be found with a guitar in hand, traveling, and exploring culinary destinations across the country. Jim holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. As a certified Aviation/Aerospace safety professional, he is a rated FAA single and multi- engine pilot, an advanced instructor, and an airframe and power-plant mechanic. He earned a Master of Arts degree in Human Resource Development and a doctorate, with distinction, in the field of Human and Organization Studies, both from The George Washington University. Jim's research interests include strategic change, leadership, and collective cognition.

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This article explores the relationship between (employee) silence and knowledge transfer, which has not been adequately examined. Employee silence is the...

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